Haskell

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Haskell is a functional programming language which is pure and statically-typed. It's known for lazy evaluation, where evaluation is deferred until necessary, and its purity, where monads are used for working with side-effects.
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Track mentors

11 Mentors

Our mentors are friendly, experienced Haskell developers who will help teach you new techniques and tricks.
Track students

4,829 Students

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Track exercises

89 Exercises

Hundreds of hours have gone into making these exercises fun, useful, and challenging to help you enjoy learning.

About Haskell

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}
module Main (main) where
import Web.Scotty

main = scotty 3000 $
  get "/:who" $ do
    who <- param "who"
    text $
      "Beam " <> who <> " up, Scotty!"

Haskell is a general-purpose programming language known for being purely functional, non-strict with strong static typing and for having type inference.

Purely functional means that you don't update variables or modify state. Pure functions will always return the same value given the same input and will do nothing else. Functions that are referentially transparent are more predictable and more composable. Non-strict (somewhat like lazy) means that you can express infinite data structures. Strong static typing means that a lot of program errors are caught during compilation. Type inference means that the compiler can often figure out the type of a value by itself. The compiler can also tell you if a value has conflicting types in different parts of the code.

There are more than 10,000 free third-party packages available at Hackage, the Haskell community's central package archive, and you can download them using the Stack tool that Exercism also uses.

You can also read the free book Learn You a Haskell for Great Good or follow the interactive tutorial at tryhaskell.org.

Join the Haskell track

To me, the standout track has been the Haskell track.

With only a very limited grasp of functional programming, the frequent and insightful comments I received were invaluable in getting to know the language.

Relaxed. Encouraging. Supportive.

Meet the Haskell Track mentors

Once you join the Haskell language track, you will receive support and feedback from our team of mentors. Here are the bios of a few of the mentors of this track.

Avatar of Adrian King Legaspi

Adrian King Legaspi https://github.com/akilegaspi

Generally a Purely Functional Programming advocate and Professional Software Engineer in Scala/Haskell
Avatar of Kieran Trezona-le Comte

Kieran Trezona-le Comte https://github.com/trezona-lecomte

I enjoy writing Haskell because of its power and robustness. I also love that it stretches my brain in weird and wonderful ways.
Avatar of Alex Kavanagh

Alex Kavanagh https://github.com/ajkavanagh

Haskell is a mind expanding language and I love the way it changes how you think about programming. I'm still fairly new to Haskell, but was a seasoned Schemer in the past, and use FP techniques whenever they are appropriate.
Avatar of Matthias Wimmer

Matthias Wimmer Matthias' Blog

Professionaly I do embedded programming in a mixture of C and Rust code. Coding in Clojure and 10+ years Java before. I couldn't apply Haskell directly at work so far, but feel how it influenced my way of programming in other languages as well.
Avatar of Bhavik Mehta

Bhavik Mehta https://github.com/b-mehta

I love functional programming, especially the deep theoretical background that comes with Haskell as well as the readability and safety it provides.
Avatar of Simon Hafner

Simon Hafner https://github.com/reactormonk

type-driven development evangelist
Fun. Challenging. Interesting

Community-sourced Haskell exercises

These are a few of the 89 exercises on the Haskell track. You can see all the exercises here.

Poker
medium
maybe
Food Chain
medium
refactoring
Grains
easy
maybe
number theory
Luhn
medium
algorithms
strings
Saddle Points
medium
misc
Hello World
easy
strings

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