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orvly's solution

to Roman Numerals in the D Track

Published at Aug 31 2019 · 0 comments
Instructions
Test suite
Solution

Write a function to convert from normal numbers to Roman Numerals.

The Romans were a clever bunch. They conquered most of Europe and ruled it for hundreds of years. They invented concrete and straight roads and even bikinis. One thing they never discovered though was the number zero. This made writing and dating extensive histories of their exploits slightly more challenging, but the system of numbers they came up with is still in use today. For example the BBC uses Roman numerals to date their programmes.

The Romans wrote numbers using letters - I, V, X, L, C, D, M. (notice these letters have lots of straight lines and are hence easy to hack into stone tablets).

 1  => I
10  => X
 7  => VII

There is no need to be able to convert numbers larger than about 3000. (The Romans themselves didn't tend to go any higher)

Wikipedia says: Modern Roman numerals ... are written by expressing each digit separately starting with the left most digit and skipping any digit with a value of zero.

To see this in practice, consider the example of 1990.

In Roman numerals 1990 is MCMXC:

1000=M 900=CM 90=XC

2008 is written as MMVIII:

2000=MM 8=VIII

See also: http://www.novaroma.org/via_romana/numbers.html

Getting Started

Make sure you have read D page on exercism.io. This covers the basic information on setting up the development environment expected by the exercises.

Passing the Tests

Get the first test compiling, linking and passing by following the three rules of test-driven development. Create just enough structure by declaring namespaces, functions, classes, etc., to satisfy any compiler errors and get the test to fail. Then write just enough code to get the test to pass. Once you've done that, uncomment the next test by moving the following line past the next test.

static if (all_tests_enabled)

This may result in compile errors as new constructs may be invoked that you haven't yet declared or defined. Again, fix the compile errors minimally to get a failing test, then change the code minimally to pass the test, refactor your implementation for readability and expressiveness and then go on to the next test.

Try to use standard D facilities in preference to writing your own low-level algorithms or facilities by hand. DRefLanguage and DReference are references to the D language and D standard library.

Source

The Roman Numeral Kata http://codingdojo.org/cgi-bin/index.pl?KataRomanNumerals

Submitting Incomplete Solutions

It's possible to submit an incomplete solution so you can see how others have completed the exercise.

roman_numerals.d

module roman_numerals;

import std.stdio;


unittest
{

immutable int allTestsEnabled = 0;

// one_yields_I
{
	writefln("Conversion of 1: %s", convert(1));
	assert("I" == convert(1));
}

static if (allTestsEnabled)
{
// two_yields_II
{
	writefln("Conversion of 2: %s", convert(2));
	assert("II" == convert(2));
}

// three_yields_III
{
	writefln("Conversion of 3: %s", convert(3));
	assert("III" == convert(3));
}

// four_yields_IV
{
	writefln("Conversion of 4: %s", convert(4));
	assert("IV" == convert(4));
}

// five_yields_V
{
	writefln("Conversion of 5: %s", convert(5));
	assert("V" == convert(5));
}

// six_yields_VI
{
	writefln("Conversion of 6: %s", convert(6));
	assert("VI" == convert(6));
}

// nine_yields_IX
{
	writefln("Conversion of 9: %s", convert(9));
	assert("IX" == convert(9));
}

// twenty_seven_yields_XXVII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 27: %s", convert(27));
	assert("XXVII" == convert(27));
}

// forty_eight_yields_XLVIII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 48: %s", convert(48));
	assert("XLVIII" == convert(48));
}

// fifty_nine_yields_LIX
{
	writefln("Conversion of 59: %s", convert(59));
	assert("LIX" == convert(59));
}

// ninety_three_yields_XCIII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 93: %s", convert(93));
	assert("XCIII" == convert(93));
}

// one_hundred_forty_one_yields_CXLI
{
	writefln("Conversion of 141: %s", convert(141));
	assert("CXLI" == convert(141));
}

// one_hundred_sixty_three_yields_CLXIII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 163: %s", convert(163));
	assert("CLXIII" == convert(163));
}

// four_hundred_two_yields_CDII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 402: %s", convert(402));
	assert("CDII" == convert(402));
}

// five_hundred_seventy_five_yields_DLXXV
{
	writefln("Conversion of 575: %s", convert(575));
	assert("DLXXV" == convert(575));
}

// nine_hundred_eleven_yields_CMXI
{
	writefln("Conversion of 911: %s", convert(911));
	assert("CMXI" == convert(911));
}

// one_thousand_twenty_four_yields_MXXIV
{
	writefln("Conversion of 1024: %s", convert(1024));
	assert("MXXIV" == convert(1024));
}

// three_thousand_yields_MMM)
{
	writefln("Conversion of 3000: %s", convert(3000));
	assert("MMM" == convert(3000));
}
}

}
module roman_numerals;

import std.stdio;

// Returns an anoymous InputRange of strings on which we can iterate 
// to return the full string in Roman numerals.
// Doesn't use GC since Romans didn't have GC, back in the days.
// Solution is based off of user fsouza's, but using ranges and GC to make
// it more challenging for me.
pure auto convertNoGc(int n) @nogc
{
    struct NumData {
        int Number;
        string Letter;
    }
    struct RomanRange {
        immutable(NumData[13]) numerals = [ 
            {1000, "M"}, {900, "CM"}, {500, "D"}, {400, "CD"}, {100, "C"}, {90, "XC"}, 
            {50, "L"}, {40, "XL"}, {10, "X"}, {9, "IX"}, {5, "V"}, {4, "IV"}, {1, "I"} ];

        // State of this generator:
        int i = 0;        // Current place in the numerals array
        int number;       // Current number, starts with the given one and chopped off every time we advance in the array
        int repeat = 0;   // Number of times to repeat the current numeral, can be 0.

        // Utility function which advances in the array until we find the place to stop.
        // Chopping off the number is done in popFront().
        void advance() @nogc {
            // Advance in numerals until we get to one below our number
            while(i < numerals.length && this.number < numerals[i].Number)
                i += 1;
            // If we got to the end, don't go on
            if (i == numerals.length)
                return;
            // Calculate the number of times to repeat the current numeral
            // -1 because foreach calls first to front() so when we exit the ctor
            // or popFront() we are already in the first iteration of this numeral.
            repeat = (number / numerals[i].Number) - 1;
        }
        this(int number) @nogc { 
            this.number = number;
            // In the beginning we should already be on the first place in the array
            // since foreach will call front() . So we advance here in the ctor to be ready.
            advance();
        }
        string front() @nogc {
            return numerals[i].Letter;
        }
        bool empty() @nogc {
            return i >= numerals.length;
        }
        void popFront() @nogc {
            if (repeat > 0) {
                // If we should be repeating the current numeral, don't adavnce i or chop the number,
                // just count down, front() will return the same numeral.
                repeat -= 1;
            } else {
                // Chop the number
                number %= numerals[i].Number;
                advance();
            }
        }
    }
    return RomanRange(n);
}
string convert(int n)
{
    import std.array;
    import std.exception;
    enforce(n <= 3000, "The years 3001 or above are not achievable, even by Pax Romana");

    // Throw away the nice @nogc we worked so hard above by allocating and using join :-)
    // since the unit test requires a string and we have to allocate.
    return join(convertNoGc(n));
}


unittest
{

immutable int allTestsEnabled = 1;

// one_yields_I
{
	writefln("Conversion of 1: %s", convert(1));
	assert("I" == convert(1));
}
static if (allTestsEnabled)
{

// two_yields_II
{
	writefln("Conversion of 2: %s", convert(2));
	assert("II" == convert(2));
}

// three_yields_III
{
	writefln("Conversion of 3: %s", convert(3));
	assert("III" == convert(3));
}

// four_yields_IV
{
	writefln("Conversion of 4: %s", convert(4));
	assert("IV" == convert(4));
}

// five_yields_V
{
	writefln("Conversion of 5: %s", convert(5));
	assert("V" == convert(5));
}

// six_yields_VI
{
	writefln("Conversion of 6: %s", convert(6));
	assert("VI" == convert(6));
}

// nine_yields_IX
{
	writefln("Conversion of 9: %s", convert(9));
	assert("IX" == convert(9));
}

// twenty_seven_yields_XXVII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 27: %s", convert(27));
	assert("XXVII" == convert(27));
}

// forty_eight_yields_XLVIII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 48: %s", convert(48));
	assert("XLVIII" == convert(48));
}

// fifty_nine_yields_LIX
{
	writefln("Conversion of 59: %s", convert(59));
	assert("LIX" == convert(59));
}

// ninety_three_yields_XCIII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 93: %s", convert(93));
	assert("XCIII" == convert(93));
}

// one_hundred_forty_one_yields_CXLI
{
	writefln("Conversion of 141: %s", convert(141));
	assert("CXLI" == convert(141));
}

// one_hundred_sixty_three_yields_CLXIII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 163: %s", convert(163));
	assert("CLXIII" == convert(163));
}

// four_hundred_two_yields_CDII
{
	writefln("Conversion of 402: %s", convert(402));
	assert("CDII" == convert(402));
}

// five_hundred_seventy_five_yields_DLXXV
{
	writefln("Conversion of 575: %s", convert(575));
	assert("DLXXV" == convert(575));
}

// nine_hundred_eleven_yields_CMXI
{
	writefln("Conversion of 911: %s", convert(911));
	assert("CMXI" == convert(911));
}

// one_thousand_twenty_four_yields_MXXIV
{
	writefln("Conversion of 1024: %s", convert(1024));
	assert("MXXIV" == convert(1024));
}

// three_thousand_yields_MMM)
{
	writefln("Conversion of 3000: %s", convert(3000));
	assert("MMM" == convert(3000));
}

}

}

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orvly's Reflection

A slightly over complicated solution, on purpose, written to get more familiar with writing D ranges and with @nogc functions and their intersection. The nogc is of course totally wasted here, it's thrown away in the convert() function, but it was still very educational for me. Inspired by the really nifty solution by user fsouza's, which was short and to the point.