Installing Node.js

There are at least two common options to run JavaScript code: the browsers and Node.js. Here we are going to use Node.js to run our JavaScript code. Let's see how to install Node.js locally:

Windows users: find official installers on Node.js downloads. Choose the LTS (long term support) version. It will install Node.js on your machine as well as npm (that stands for Node Package Manager), a tool that helps installing applications that run on top of Node.js.

Mac OS X users: same as Windows users, you will find official installers on Node.js downloads. Choose the LTS version. It will install Node.js and npm on your machine.

Linux users: there are binaries for node and npm tools on the Node.js downloads page, but the recommended way to install them on a Linux machine is via a package manager. As of writing this, the recommended version of Node.js to install is 4.x. To install it on a Debian or Ubuntu Linux distribution just execute these commands:

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curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_4.x | sudo -E bash -
sudo apt-get install -y nodejs

If you are using a different distribution or package manager, you can find a complete list of supported ones on the official documentation page: Installing Node.js via package manager.

Installing additional tools

The next step is to install Jasmine globally so that you can run JavaScript tests:

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npm install -g jasmine

Depending on your setup, you may need super user privileges to install an npm module globally. This is the case if you've used the official installer linked to above. If npm gives you an error saying you don't have access, add sudo to the command above:

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sudo npm install -g jasmine

If you've used the official installer, your PATH should have been automatically configured, but if your shell has trouble locating your globally installed modules—or if you build Node.js from source—update your PATH to include the npm binaries by adding the following to either ~/.bash_profile or ~/.zshrc:

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export PATH=/usr/local/share/npm/bin:$PATH