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exercism fetch python simple-linked-list

Simple Linked List

Write a simple linked list implementation that uses Elements and a List.

The linked list is a fundamental data structure in computer science, often used in the implementation of other data structures. They're pervasive in functional programming languages, such as Clojure, Erlang, or Haskell, but far less common in imperative languages such as Ruby or Python.

The simplest kind of linked list is a singly linked list. Each element in the list contains data and a "next" field pointing to the next element in the list of elements.

This variant of linked lists is often used to represent sequences or push-down stacks (also called a LIFO stack; Last In, First Out).

As a first take, lets create a singly linked list to contain the range (1..10), and provide functions to reverse a linked list and convert to and from arrays.

When implementing this in a language with built-in linked lists, implement your own abstract data type.

Hints

To support list(), see implementing an iterator for a class.

Additionally, note that Python2's next() has been replaced by __next__() in Python3. For dual compatibility, next() can be implemented as:

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def next(self):
    return self.__next__()

Submitting Exercises

Note that, when trying to submit an exercise, make sure the solution is in the exercism/python/<exerciseName> directory.

For example, if you're submitting bob.py for the Bob exercise, the submit command would be something like exercism submit <path_to_exercism_dir>/python/bob/bob.py.

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Source

Inspired by 'Data Structures and Algorithms with Object-Oriented Design Patterns in Ruby', singly linked-lists. http://www.brpreiss.com/books/opus8/html/page96.html#SECTION004300000000000000000

Submitting Incomplete Solutions

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