exercism fetch go all-your-base

All Your Base

Convert a number, represented as a sequence of digits in one base, to any other base.

Implement general base conversion. Given a number in base a, represented as a sequence of digits, convert it to base b.


About Positional Notation

In positional notation, a number in base b can be understood as a linear combination of powers of b.

The number 42, in base 10, means:

(4 * 101) + (2 * 100)

The number 101010, in base 2, means:

(1 * 25) + (0 * 24) + (1 * 23) + (0 * 22) + (1 * 21) + (0 * 20)

The number 1120, in base 3, means:

(1 * 33) + (1 * 32) + (2 * 31) + (0 * 30)

I think you got the idea!

Yes. Those three numbers above are exactly the same. Congratulations!



  1. Zero is always represented in outputs as [0] instead of [].
  2. In no other instances are leading zeroes present in any outputs.
  3. Leading zeroes are accepted in inputs.
  4. An empty sequence of input digits is considered zero, rather than an error.

Handle problem cases by returning an error whose Error() method returns one of following messages:

Running the tests

To run the tests run the command go test from within the exercise directory.

If the test suite contains benchmarks, you can run these with the -bench flag:

go test -bench .

Keep in mind that each reviewer will run benchmarks on a different machine, with different specs, so the results from these benchmark tests may vary.

Further information

For more detailed information about the Go track, including how to get help if you're having trouble, please visit the exercism.io Go language page.

Submitting Incomplete Solutions

It's possible to submit an incomplete solution so you can see how others have completed the exercise.